Friday Fictioneers Jan 27th – Carry That Load

Time for this weeks contribution to the Friday Fictioneers Challenge to write a 100 word story based on the photo prompt.

Interested in finding out more about this challenge and the group of writers that accept the challenge each week, start with our host’s Rochelle Wisoff-Fields site by clicking HERE.

Every week numerous writers take on the challenge submitting surprising and engaging stories. Have a look at this weeks submissions by clicking READ MORE.

Thank you Al Forbes for this weeks photo.

PHOTO PROMPT © Al Forbes
PHOTO PROMPT © Al Forbes

Carry That Load

He was dragging a heavy burden exposed for all to see. Its jagged edges had left scars across his body. Mike struggled to shine dull surfaces until they gleamed. Friends, even strangers offered desperately needed parts. Just when he felt like he was speeding down the road, life threw a monkey wrench leaving him stranded, broken. His foster parents never tired and never let him give up.

In cap and gown, he waited for his name to be called, Dr. Michael Harris. He was proud to show off the polished result of his efforts, the past no longer a burden.

101 words.

Thanks for taking the time to read.

Cindy

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Friday Fictioneers, Jan 20th – The Dawning of Wisdom

Time for this weeks contribution to the Friday Fictioneers Challenge to write a 100 word story based on the photo prompt.

Interested in finding out more about this challenge and the group of writers that accept the challenge each week, start with our host’s Rochelle Wisoff-Fields site by clicking HERE.

Click HERE to fall down the rabbit hole to read stories posted by all those that participated in this week’s challenge.

Thank you Rochelle for selecting this weeks beautiful photo and to Dale Rogerson for providing it. This was a challenging one for me. I struggled with trying to ground the photo into a place and was unsuccessful so this week I went with the feeling, reverence, the photo elicited, from me more than a place it revealed to me.

PHOTO PROMPT © Dale Rogerson
PHOTO PROMPT © Dale Rogerson

The Dawning of Wisdom (Word Count:97)

Lisa rolled her eyes whenever her teacher stopped to point out another boring painting. She mimicked in a pinched voice “The sparing use of color contrasts sharply with the application of thick brush strokes.”

“Geez, get a life,” Lisa muttered. Who cared about paintings done by dead Canadians?

Following the pack through a narrow opening lined with arches, Lisa stopped dead in her tracks, dwarfed by the large canvas.

“How?” she wondered.

The stark solitude it portrayed mirrored her isolation. The soaring heights capped with light matched the hope she clung to.

How had the artist known?

Painting by Lawren Harris
Painting by Lawren Harris

This story is based on my experience when visiting the McMichael Collection in Kleinburg, Ontario. It houses the largest collection of paintings done by the Group of Seven, famous Canadian artists known for their landscape paintings. My favorite among the group is Lawren Harris. It was his paintings that literally stopped me in my tracks more then twelve years ago. I carry that feeling with me to this day.

Curious about these famous Canadian artist click HERE.

Thanks for dropping by. Leave me a comment. I love comments!

Cindy

 

The Scrivener’s Forge 1 Writing Exercise – The Power of a Child’s Laughter

Did you know there is a new kid on the block? It is Scrivener’s Forge a once a month exercise that focuses on different writing skills. If you would like more information on Scrivener’s Forge, which is hosted by Neil McDonald, click HERE.

To read the stories that have been submitted click HERE.

Now down to business here is my 495 word story.

The Power of a Child’s Laughter

At the airport, I joined the crush of people weaving their way in longs lines through the security checkpoints and headed towards my gate. Once there, I dropped into a utilitarian seat for the hour wait before my plane was to depart.

I am not a good flier. I am terrified by the prospect of hurtling through the air at 550 mph trapped in a small metal tube. The cherry on top of what I knew would be a long, frustrating day was the snowstorm that had settled in overnight. I nervously glanced at the snow piling up outside the window expecting that any minute I would hear the garbled voice that would pronounce my flight canceled. To ease my fraying nerves, I pulled out my e-reader. My escape was short-lived. From the depth of my book, I heard the strained voice of an exasperated young mother. I looked up to observe her trying to corral a spunky two-year-old hell-bent on exploring the strange world around her. The bewildered mother stood clasping the hood of an empty jacket while her toddler made her way over to me. Inexperienced in running with bulky boots, the child’s forward momentum came to a crashing stop at my knees.

The frustrated mother was shrieking “Jessica, stop, Jessica get back here.” It was a mantra she repeated until she managed to swoop in and pick up an unsuspecting Jessica. With a whispered “I’m sorry,” the twosome rejoined their abandoned luggage.

The mother’s scolding continued, rising in pitch as the minutes ticked by.

“Jessica, don’t do that.” An unrepentant Jessica persisted in removing her boots.

“Jessica sit still.” Without a backward glance, Jessica twirled down the aisle performing a ballet for all to see, before once more nabbed by her mother.

“Jessica, I said sit down.” I glanced up to see Jessica climbing over the back of her seat.

On and on it went as the wait stretched to two hours, then to three. Finally, we were herded aboard the plane. Buckled securely in my seat, I watched the frazzled mother drag a curious Jessica down the narrow aisle. At each empty seat, the little girl veered off and attempted to sit down. A chorus of “No Jessica” followed them as the pair passed by me.

The plane took off while I blocked out all thoughts of the world receding below me. Suddenly, without warning, there was a terrifying feeling of floating then one of falling. A sensation similar to riding an elevator that was hurtling down its shaft. I stared at my e-reader as it floated in front of me. Fear filled the plane with expressions of shock and cursing. Just as quick as it started, the sensation of falling stopped. My e-reader settled into my lap once more.

Then I heard it. A small bubbling voice exclaiming “Whee!”

Over the giggles from many of the plane’s occupants the familiar mother’s voice cooed “Jessica, you are such a treat.”

This story is a mashup of what I observed while flying from Phoenix to Toronto, for the holidays, and a story my son recounted about his flight from Halifax to Toronto . Thanks for reading. Please give me some feed back.

Cindy

Back to Friday Fictioneers, Jan 13th – Heading West

Hey it’s a new year full of promises and hope. If laughter is contagious then  hope can be is as well.

Interested in finding out more about this challenge and the group of writers that accept the challenge each week, start with our host’s Rochelle Wisoff-Fields site by clicking the link below.

https://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/

Next, click the link below to read other stories based on this week’s prompt.

http://www.inlinkz.com/new/view.php?id=686720

So here is my first submission to this years Friday Ficitioneers.

Photo Prompt Courtesy of  C E Ari  (https://ceayr.com/)

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PHOTO PROMPT © C.E. Ayr

The faint hum turned into a vibration rising up through the thin soles of his battered sneakers.

A deafening roar rode the wave of air pushed aside by the train. The metal bit his bare hand as he swung up into the dark car. His breath formed a thick blanket around him, offering little warmth. He smiled as the train lurched into motion heading west to Vancouver. The Promised Land far from here.

“Ah jeez.” The Winnipeg railway man looked down at the frozen body of the adolescent. “Son what could have driven you to such a lonely cruel death?”

100 words

Thanks for reading. Please take a minute to leave me a comment.